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Ename

Ename, at the former border between the Ottonian Empire and the French Kingdom, grew into a well-known Ottonian margravial centre during the tenth century. Presently, the foundations of the Ottonian site and the Benedictine abbey are integrated into a provincial archaeological park.

  • AD 1050 – Modern Era

AD 1050 – Modern Era

Developement of the site

In 1047 the Flemish count Baldwin V took definitive possession of Ename and later on established a Benedictine abbey. In 1063 abbot Walbrecht and his twelve monks came from the Saint Vaast abbey in Arras to Ename and obtained the old castellum and the church dedicated to Our Lady from the count and the countess of Flanders. Before 1070 they moved to the area near the Saint Salvator church where they built a new monastery with building material from the castrum. From that moment on the site was demilitarized and the small commercial settlement no longer existed.

In the course of the centuries the monastery and the church were rebuilt and enlarged several times. They were also destroyed during the religious troubles in the second half of the 16th century. The rebuilding program lasted almost a century.

In 1795 the French revolutionaries invaded the southern Netherlands: the monastery was confiscated and demolished. The possessions of the abbey were sold.
During the more than seven hundred years that the Saint Salvator abbey existed, Ename remained a rural village. The monastery developed new areas in the 12th and 13th century and the abbey bought Ename forest at the end of the 13th century for commercial benefits. The abbey and the economic system of the Ancien Régime both disappeared at the same time. During the centuries before, the monastery’s revenue came from the feudal rights on the possessions in Ename and other areas (toll, market and milling rights, jurisdiction, tithes, etc.). Fig. 19
30 31 32 33

Fig. 19: The abbey of Ename in the 4th quarter of the 13th century. Credits: Veil Rentier, Koninklijke bibliotheek Brussel. Digitale afbeelding copyright Daniël Pletinckx – Visual Dimension bvba

Fig. 19: The abbey of Ename in the 4th quarter of the 13th century. Credits: Veil Rentier, Koninklijke bibliotheek Brussel. Digitale afbeelding copyright Daniël Pletinckx – Visual Dimension bvba

References

30 Callebaut, Dirk (met een bijdrage van Buyle, Marjan), ‘De Sint-Laurentiuskerk van Ename, een vroeg 11 de –eeuws symbool van stabilitas regni et fidelitas imperatoris‘, Archeologie in Vlaanderen, Brussel, Instituut voor het Archeologisch Patrimonium, 1992, Dl. II, p. 435-470

31 Callebaut, Dirk, ‘Ename and the Ottonian west border policy in the middle Scheldt region‘, in Exchanging Medieval Material Culture. Studies on archaeology and history presented to Frans Verhaeghe, Relicta Monografieën 4, Brussel, VIOE-VUB, 2010, pp. 217-248

32 Berings, Geert, Landschap, geschiedenis en archeologie in het Oudenaardse, Stadsbestuur Oudenaarde, 1989, pp. 135-187

33 De Groote, Koen and Lemay, Nancy, ‘De materiële cultuur in de Sint-Salvatorabdij te Ename. Twee mideeleeuwse latrines uit de westvleugel en een 17 de –eeuwse afvalput uit de priorij’, Archeologie in Vlaanderen, Brussel, Instituut voor het Archeologisch Patrimonium, 1993, Dl. 3, pp. 401-418

Continue to: Modern Era – Today

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